• Symbols

    Subtlety is a big thing in wedding rings. They don’t need to shout things to the world, but just quietly remind us of what’s most important to us. Adding symbols to rings often works better the more understated it is. The maple and cedar tree outlines represent a Canadian and Lebanese couple beautifully.

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  • Rope, knots & swirls

    Why not tie the knot with an actual knot? I spent a while with the figure of eight ring getting the fold of the cord right. I was looking at a knot in square leather thong, and the way it squished it in and out was what defined the character of the ring. These are some examples of how I can make twisted wedding rings.

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  • Art deco & Celtic

    In the first half of the twentieth century we made some wonderful metalwork. Improvements in production made them it more widely available and the vintage wedding rings are still available. Modern rings are much more about the stones so the techniques are on the wane. Most of these are wedding rings I’ve sculpted to match the pattern of a vintage engagement ring.

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  • Plants & animals

    Lots of people seem to identify with plants and trees. Oak comes up fairly regularly and I’ve worked with roots, bark, leaves and acorns. Often a pair of rings will have a plant or tree in common, but different parts of it, so the woman might have the leaves and the man the bark or roots, giving a very different texture and style, but still having a strong bond. 

    When thinking about your favourite plant or tree, the branches and bark might seem an odd thing to represent them. However, as many people look for subtlety or abstraction in their wedding rings, this idea has come up fairly regularly for people who feel something more obvious isn't for them. It also brings up a wonderful range of shapes and textures to include.

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  • Natural textures

    Water and lava make all kinds of wonderful shapes and textures. These are rings that have played around with that in one way or another. Getting a deep, complex, but natural feel often involves hitting the ring with about a dozen different things to avoid repeated marks, and some of these are deliberately only partially polished to maintain some of the casting patina.

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