• Practical & Smooth

    This is the simplest, most subtle way to set a stone in a ring. It allows me to play around with the design in lots of interesting ways and not worry too much about how the stones are going to fit in. As the stone doesn’t protrude from the ring the style lends itself very well to wedding rings. I’ve made quite a few rings with gems set on the inside, often birthstones or a nod to the engagement ring, which works much like an engraving. The two little green diamonds are for ‘two peas in a pod’.

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  • Eternity rings

    The 'rules' around when eternity rings are supposed to be given by a husband to his wife seem to be a little vague. Some people cite birth of the first child as the time, others 5 years of marriage. Honestly though, who would pass up an opportunity to get another lovely sparkly item of jewellery?

    Eternity rings are usually set with gemstones to match or complement the engagement and wedding rings. They traditionally have diamonds or other gemstones around the entire band but often a half eternity is more realistically affordable. Here are also some examples with children's birthstones, which is a lovely sentimental touch. 

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  • Bold & Sparkly

    Pavé settings give extra twinkle to a ring from the metalwork around the stones. It gives a wonderfully ornate look if you’re looking for something a bit fancier. Having the milgrain texture on the edge of the metal adds to this even further.

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  • Sculpted & sentimental

    These sculpted wedding rings mostly include rubover settings to make the stone a fluid part of the design. I particularly enjoyed making the diamond in the crater for a relation of mine who is into astronomy. The six roses with tiny diamonds in their centres worked particularly well. One millimetre round diamonds give a surprisingly good twinkle for their size and let me play around lots with the design.

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